Championship Show 2021
20th November
Download schedule from Fosse Data
http://fossedata.co.uk/downloads/pdf/DACH_NOV_21_Schedule.pdf
Postal entries WILL NOT be accepted for this show.

SSTOP PRESS............ STOP PRESS.............. STOP PRESS...........

CHANGE OF JUDGE - CHAMPIONSHIP SHOW 20.11.21

Unfortunately due to an ongoing health issue, Phil Rollinson our scheduled judge of Miniature Smooth Haired Dachshunds has had to withdraw from his appointment - the club would like to wish Phil a speedy recovery.

We are pleased to announce that Min Smooths will now be judged by Mrs Rachel Barney (Verrami)

Entries remain open and entries can be made online up till 27.10.21

http://www.fossedata.co.uk/show_schedules/schedule.aspx...

Dont forget you can advertise your dogs and their wins with a colour full page advert in the catalogue for just £20 - contact the secretary for full details and formats required

Update to the breed standard.

DACHSHUND

General Appearance Moderately long in proportion to height, with no exaggeration. Compact, well- muscled body, with enough ground clearance, not less than one quarter of the height at the withers, to allow free movement. Height at the withers should be half the length of the body, measured from breastbone to the rear of thigh. Bold, defiant carriage of head and intelligent expression.

Characteristics Intelligent, lively, courageous to the point of rashness, obedient. Especially suited to going to ground because of low build, very strong forequarters and forelegs. Long, strong jaw, and immense power of bite and hold. Excellent nose, persevering hunter and tracker. Essential that functional build, size and proportions ensure working ability.

Head and Skull Long, appearing conical when

seen from above; viewed from the side, tapering uniformly to tip of nose. Skull only slightly arched. Neither too broad nor too narrow, sloping gradually without prominent stop into slightly arched muzzle. Length from tip of nose to eyes equal to length from eyes to occiput. In Wire haired, particularly, ridges over eyes strongly prominent, giving appearance

of slightly broader skull. Lips closely fitting, neatly covering lower jaw.

Forequarters Shoulder blades long, broad, and placed firmly and obliquely (45 degrees to the horizontal) upon robust rib cage. Upper arm the same length as shoulder blade, set at 90 degrees to it, very strong, and covered with hard, supple muscles. Upper arm lies close to ribs, but able to move freely. Forearm short and strong in bone, inclining inwards, forming a slight crook which

fits neatly around the chest. When seen in profile, forearm moderately straight, must not bend forward or knuckle over, which indicates unsoundness. Correctly placed foreleg should cover the lowest point of the keel, with ground clearance never less than one quarter of the height at the withers.

Body Moderately long and full muscled. Sloping shoulders, back reasonably level, blending harmoniously between withers and slightly arched loin. Withers and quarters of approximately the same height. Loin short and strong. Breast bone strong, and so prominent that a depression appears on either side of it in front. When viewed from front, thorax full and oval; when viewed from the side

or above, full volumed, so allowing by its ample capacity complete development of heart and lungs. Ribs extending well back with good length

of sternum. Underline gradually merging into line of abdomen. Body sufficiently clear of ground to allow free movement.

Hindquarters Rump full, broad and strong, pliant muscles. Croup long, full, robustly muscled, only slightly sloping towards tail. Pelvis strong, set obliquely and not too short. Upper thigh set at

right angles to pelvis, strong and of good length. Lower thigh short, set at right angles to upper thigh and well-muscled. Viewed from the rear, hind legs straight and parallel, neither close nor wide apart.

Tail Continues line of spine, but slightly curved, without kink or twist, not carried above the topline, or touching ground when at rest.

Faults Any departure from the foregoing points, including desired body condition, should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog as well as its ability to perform its traditional work.

(No change to other clauses)